Grow your own / At home DIY stuff/fixing your own

Discussion in 'Food & Drink Discussion' started by yongjin02, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    Food that is... :encouragement:

    anyone else here do anything at home to produce their own food? Even a little bit is good

    anyways-it was a good yr for pears here

    We have the "regular" (not sure of actual breed since i didn't plant them) green/yellow pear trees, red pear and korean pear (yes the "asian" pear but in this house it is the Korean pear:vala-new011:)

    for the first time in nearly 25 yrs, these green/yellow pear trees my parents planted actually had a good production

    they let them get too big, never pruned them

    over four yrs, i pruned them back to production size--you cant cut off too much in one yr, you'll kill the tree

    got very large pears this yr

    a pic

    the egg-one of our "jumbos"-is for size comparison

    a very large green/yellow pear and a korean pear


    upload_2014-10-15_13-1-43.png

    yeah--its up side down! so what--you get the picture :chuncky:
     
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  2. Overmind One

    Overmind One GateFans Gatemaster Staff Member

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    Do you ship? :) I love pears....I make an "apple pie" that contains no apples. Just pears! And I dare you to tell the difference. I bet your wife will find lots of goodies to make with those pears, plus they are just plain good to eat in their natural form. I like that I can eat the skin.

    I have become VERY interested in farming indoors on a very micro scale. I want to grow lettuce especially. But I also want tomatoes, a variety that will do well indoors. Do you know anything about growing with lights? I have become good at growing that certain plant I like. :) I do not yet know the needs of lettuce and tomatoes. Are there any diminutive fruit trees that can be grown to fruit indoors?
     
  3. Joelist

    Joelist I'm showing this for a reason! Staff Member

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    How about growing this:

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    I could ship them via UPS or fedex and i am sure they would be fine--however--we only have what we will eat so far. the trees are still relatively small-we have more young ones growing

    we mostly just eat them after a few days of setting. we also use them and apples to marinate beef or pork adds to tenderness and gives the meat a sweet flavor, kind of like using honey but less noticeable

    from what i have been told/read=the trick is to keep the apple/pear trees pruned (apples and pears are virtually the same thing, many ppl don't realize that, but you have figured that out) so they produce as much as possible (eliminate vertical growth as only horizontal branches produce fruit) and to have as many trees as your land can sustain

    many ppl think that big tree = max fruit- not true for these guys

    Have you ever had asian pears? doesn't matter the name--chojuro, nashi, japanese pear, korean pear several varieties of the same basic thing

    ===also a cool thing happened this yr. Several yrs ago, we saved seeds from a d'anjou pear we bought in the store. we got some seeds to grow but didn't expect to get fruit (many store fruits are modified so you cant get fruit from a homegrown tree)

    but we did--so we moved the tree closer to the house--protect from deer/bear--and this yr it apparently cross pollinated with one of our korean pear trees\ what we got were smallish egg shaped green/yellow pears apparently a hybrid cross pollinated creation--they were very ugly but very very sweet

    ======================================
    lettuce and spinach should be very easy to grow--trick is to not overheat them--they are a cool weather crop, and to not overwater them

    we have grown stuff indoors to get them started under "brooder lights" (they are way cheaper then the lights marketed for growth) with standard 100 w bulbs on a timer set to mimick sunrise/sunset
    but they are mostly early started tree and bush seeds
    ========================================
    there are several trees you should be able to grow indoors near a window

    thing about many fruit trees--since they are deciduous and products of the northern hemisphere (apples and pears are from central asia originally it is believed)--they need a winter/resting (chill hours) season or at least your ability to mimick one

    many online ordering nurseries--i have never had a problem with many of them--have some variety of mini dwarf fruit trees
    you could probaly keep them potted and on your front or back stoop during the winter there and then bring them in at spring (after the bees do their work!) to protect the buds and fruit from kids and other varmints

    these only get about 6' tall but could be trained to produce at a lower height with care

    http://www.raintreenursery.com/Fruit_Trees/Apples/Mini_-_Dwarf_Apples/

    and the "fruit salad" trees

    http://www.groworganic.com/multi-grafted-western-fruit-salad-standard.html

    i have noticed that Cali has a lot of restrictions so better check before you get your mind set on anything

    do you have a flat roof on your apt? do you have access? if so, those make safer growing spots also
     
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  5. Overmind One

    Overmind One GateFans Gatemaster Staff Member

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    I had to ask. :)

    This is EXACTLY how my "other" plants are grown. I use a technique known as "weaving". No more trimming, as the plant will drop leaves it does not need when it decides to. I learned that one. :)

    I eat them all the time. :) They are called just Asian Pears here. Whole Foods carries several varieties.

    You got by accident what many labs try to get by genetic engineering. :anim_59:

    I already have a fully light controllable grow pod, remember? :) I can control day, night, humidity, etc. I even have the meter for moisture, PH and light spectrum.

    I have a light timer for that. You need to do that with the "other" plants too.

    You cant grow certain fruit trees outdoors here because of fruit flies and unintentional spreading by birds or other animals like possums and rats and squirrels. The state says which ones are allowed. But indoors is different.

    I prefer to go with the grow lights indoors. That was very helpful information about the lettuce and temperature. I do not have a thermometer in my pods. :)
     
  6. Illiterati

    Illiterati Council Member & Author

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    We planted lychee seeds several weeks ago and now have over 6 little seedlings.

    Anyone in the area want a tiny lychee seedling? LOL
     
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  7. Overmind One

    Overmind One GateFans Gatemaster Staff Member

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    Um...what is it? :anim_59:
     
  8. Illiterati

    Illiterati Council Member & Author

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    Lychee are an Asian fruit. Remind me a little bit of loquat fruit. Small fruits about 1-1.5 inches long.

    These won't be fruiting anytime soon, but they can be container grown (outside) successfully for at least their first couple years.
     
  9. Overmind One

    Overmind One GateFans Gatemaster Staff Member

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    I like loquats. :) Are they a citrus fruit?
    --- merged: Oct 16, 2014 at 2:50 PM ---
    lychee fruit that is...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 23, 2014
  10. Illiterati

    Illiterati Council Member & Author

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  11. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    another thing to try with pears--especially if you got a few with spots or soft areas (apples too)

    slice the good parts into "rounds" or as round as you can

    put a very little bit of honey on a fry pan on low heat

    when the honey is runny :playful: put the pear slices in

    turn up the heat and do not turn them over.

    let them cook just enough till the honey gets a little brownish and the sugar of the fruit is heated

    i then put them on a plate and put just a little bit of cinnamon on them

    they tasty very good--much better than the phrase "fried pears" seems to sound
     
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  12. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    had an abundance of tomatoes this yr too--they are still growing we haven't had a frost yet--"purple Cherokees" and standard "big boys"

    we grew all the plants from seed in the temp greenhouse we set up on our deck in March--then grow them in black plastic pots on our deck (keeps away the bad bugs, rot and other tomato ruining fungi as well as keeps the roots nice and warm promoting good growth)

    what we didn't eat outright we boil down and freeze for winter "fresh tomato" use--I will not buy a tomato from the store-i don't care what label is placed on it

    --------------------------------------------------

    i think if i lived in the southwest i would get depressed, seems like you guys can't grow a lot of stuff--too hot, water restrictions, government restrictions ,etc

    our yard is covered with flowers, trees, bushes a blueberry and strawberry "pen" and a now much larger Koi pond

    all great ways to have to cut far less grass :pride:

    don't know what i would do if we lived where we couldn't grow what we wanted how we wanted too--but i am sure you guys find something to grow (if you have a yard that is)
     
  13. shavedape

    shavedape Well Known GateFan Staff Member

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    Keep in mind that a high percentage of fruit trees that nurseries sell are grafted products. This means that the stem of a small fruit tree is grafted onto a more hardy root system as the original root systems of most of these types of trees don't have the same stamina for long term growth. I know that sounds weird but it's true. So, if you grow a tree from a seedling it may not perform as you expect it to. If it works that's great, but keep in mind that it can lead to failure.
     
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  14. Illiterati

    Illiterati Council Member & Author

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    I know, but still doing it. :-)
     
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  15. shavedape

    shavedape Well Known GateFan Staff Member

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    You might have better luck in your climate. Here the winters are brutal on trees hence the need for strong root systems. We generally do okay with apple and pear trees and even cherry trees, but I've noticed that peach trees really don't do that well, at least not in my estimation (which is bolstered by the fact that I had to dig out a dead one from my backyard that the previous owners had planted a few years earlier. Same with my mom's neighbor.).
     
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  16. Illiterati

    Illiterati Council Member & Author

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    From what I've been reading, they do wonderfully here in Southern California, so that's a good sign. ;)
     
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  17. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    man..again with the negativity :anim_59:

    the best thing to do in this case is to plan for a backup--once your tree (from a seed) is about 10 yrs old or so, start another just in case

    if you have the space

    pruning may help the stamina part as well as you lessen the amount of branches to nourish the tree may stay healthy longer
     
  18. shavedape

    shavedape Well Known GateFan Staff Member

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    Moi negative? :icon_e_surprised: :icon_lol:

    I'm not trying to knock anyone for growing trees from seeds, but just wanted to let it be known the difference between home grown verses nursery stock trees; especially if one experiences failure and wonders why the growing experiment didn't work.

    Personally I think it's cool that you got a home grown tree to fruit. They hybrid fruit you got from it sounds really interesting. :encouragement:
     
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  19. yongjin02

    yongjin02 Well Known GateFan

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    the pears from it are ugly as hell but very very sweet

    see what happens with them next year
     
  20. Overmind One

    Overmind One GateFans Gatemaster Staff Member

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    Perfect for "apple" pie! There is nothing like pear juice to sweeten the pie :) sweet pears and some added pear juice means you do not have to add sugar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2014
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